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Frontier District

Ottawa Office
County Annex Building
1418 S. Main, Suite 2
Ottawa, KS 66067
785-229-3520
785-229-3527 fax

Lyndon Office
128 W. 15th
PO Box 400
Lyndon, KS 66451
785-828-4438
785-828-3427 fax

Garnett Office
411 S. Oak
PO Box 423
Garnett, KS 66032
785-448-6826
785-448-6153 fax

Livestock

Agriculture is very important to the economy of the counties in the Frontier Extension District. The agronomic value of crops and livestock in the district is nearly 250 million dollars. This comes from 615,000 acres of cropland and 530,000 acres of pasture and hay ground. Approximately half the value of production is from crops and half from livestock.

Beef cattle are the predominant livestock species within the district. From the counties in the Frontier Extension District, there are nearly 120,000 head of beef cattle. Of those, 40,000 head are cows and the remainder are calves, stocker cattle, and fed cattle. Dairy, swine, goats, and poultry production also add to the economic impact of agriculture to the district.

*Information from Kansas Agricultural Statistics Service and the 2012 Census. 


Monitoring Nutrient Status of Beef Cows

Managing cows through the winter provides different challenges compared to managing those same cows during the growing season.  The following article describes two simple tools producers can use to monitor nutrient status and ensure the cow's requirements are being met.

Monitoring Nutrient Status of Beef Cows (pdf)

Monitoring Nutrient Status of Beef Cows pg1

Monitoring Nutrient Status of Beef Cows pg2

Monitoring Nutrient Status of Beef Cows pg3


 2020 Women Managing the Farm

February 13-14, 2020
2020 Women Managing the Farm

Women Managing the Farm is a comprehensive program to connect women involved in the many aspects of agriculture. The annual conference provides valuable tools and materials to address production, price, human, financial, and legal risks of farm women at all levels. This project increases overall support through comprehensive training, area networks of support and an online discussion group.

The project builds upon the knowledge that farm women do play an active role in all aspects of financial and risk management of the farm. The changing dynamics and economics of the farm operation and the farm household lead to the changing roles women play on the farm today.

The goal of this project is to prepare modern farm women with resources to enable them to utilize and manage their farm interests effectively. The project helps farm women to be successfully prepared to participate in multiple farm roles by having the training, risk management tools, and professional resources available to them. 

Registration Link


KOFO Radio Segments

Large Round Bale Hay Storage
Management Tips for Round Hay Bales: System Selection, Harvesting, Moving and Storing
Buckbrush, Rough Leaf Dogwood & Smooth Sumac Control
Calving Season Challenges
Early Weaning
Hair Shedding Scores: A tool to select heat tolerant cattle
Drought?  Be Thinking Ahead
Using Estrus Synchronization Protocols with Natural Service Sires
Reducing animals' stress during cold periods is a key goal

Rod

Rod Schaub
District Extension Agent
Livestock Production
785-828-4438
rschaub@ksu.edu