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Frontier District

Ottawa Office
County Annex Building
1418 S. Main, Suite 2
Ottawa, KS 66067
785-229-3520
785-229-3527 fax

Lyndon Office
128 W. 15th
PO Box 400
Lyndon, KS 66451
785-828-4438
785-828-3427 fax

Garnett Office
411 S. Oak
PO Box 423
Garnett, KS 66032
785-448-6826
785-448-6153 fax

Livestock

Agriculture is very important to the economy of the counties in the Frontier Extension District. The agronomic value of crops and livestock in the district is nearly 250 million dollars. This comes from 615,000 acres of cropland and 530,000 acres of pasture and hay ground. Approximately half the value of production is from crops and half from livestock.

Beef cattle are the predominant livestock species within the district. From the counties in the Frontier Extension District, there are nearly 120,000 head of beef cattle. Of those, 40,000 head are cows and the remainder are calves, stocker cattle, and fed cattle. Dairy, swine, goats, and poultry production also add to the economic impact of agriculture to the district.

*Information from Kansas Agricultural Statistics Service and the 2012 Census.  

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Upcoming Events

 

Carbon Event

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Prescribed Fire Series 

 

Fire

This introductory to prescribed fire series covers all the basics from why we burn, fire behavior, planning and preparation, equipment, weather, and techniques. This offers a great starting resource for people new to prescribed fire and those looking for a quick refresher. Be sure to subscribe to our channel as we will be adding videos to the series in the future.

The prescribed fire series videos can be found HERE

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Monitoring Nutrient Status of Beef Cows

 

Managing cows through the winter provides different challenges compared to managing those same cows during the growing season.  The following article describes two simple tools producers can use to monitor nutrient status and ensure the cow's requirements are being met.

Monitoring Nutrient Status of Beef Cows (pdf)

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Join Dr. A.J. Tarpoff, K-State beef extension veterinarian, as he highlights certain aspects of facility design that play a big impact on both animal handling and stewardship. He will showcase a few practical, low-cost strategies that easily can be implemented on both small and large cattle operations. The Kansas Beef Council filmed and produced this video in cooperation with Kansas State University.

Rod Staff Photo

Rod Schaub
District Extension Agent
Livestock Production
785-828-4438
rschaub@ksu.edu